Archives for April 2013

May Day honors workers’ rights; Distress call for mariners

Fish Radio
May 1, 2013  May Day honors workers

This is Fish Radio. I’m Laine Welch – Today is May Day– it’s an international holiday honoring workers and a call for help. More after this –

Fish Radio is brought to you by the At-Sea Processors Association. APA fishing companies hold job fairs and support training programs to promote good paying job opportunities for Alaskans in the Alaska pollock industry. Learn more about fishing and processing jobs at www.atsea.org

Find out who’s catching all that seafood and their favorite recipes at a new micro site from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute – find it at www.wildalaskaflavor.com

May first marks a working class holiday celebrated since ancient times around the world. May Day originated in pagan Europe as a festive holy day to celebrate the end of winter and the return of the sun and fertility of the soil. Our modern version of May Day as a working class holiday evolved from the struggle for the eight hour work day. May 1, 1886 saw national strikes in the United States and Canada for an eight hour day called by the Knights of Labor. Clashes between police and striking workers resulted in many deaths. In Paris in 1889 the International Working Men’s Association declared May 1st a holiday to commemorate those who died in their fight for workers rights.

Mayday is best known to mariners as an international distress signal. The call sign originated in 1923 by a senior radio officer in London. He needed a word that would easily be understood by French and English speaking pilots and came up with ‘mayday’ – it derives from the French m’aider, meaning ‘help me.’ The mayday call is always given three times in a row to distinguish it as an actual emergency.

Back to the May Day holiday: fishermen can lay claim as workers in America’s first and oldest industry, dating back to the late 1400s. And it is our world’s only remaining hunter/gatherer industry for a wild food source. The seafood industry is Alaska’s largest private employer. Well over half of our nation’s wild caught seafood comes from Alaska.

Fish Radio is also brought to you by Ocean Beauty Seafoods is brought to you by Ocean Beauty Seafoods, an Alaska corporation proudly supporting Alaska’s coastal communities and the Alaskans who depend on fishing for their livelihoods and culture. In Kodiak, I’m Laine Welch. www.oceanbeauty.com

Big mines and salmon don’t mix at Bristol Bay, says EPA

Fish Radio
April 30, 2013

 Bristol Bay would be harmed by large mine, says EPA

Sockeye Pie Chart Credit: Nature Conservancy

Sockeye Pie Chart
Credit: Nature Conservancy

 This is Fish Radio. I’m Laine Welch … Big mines and salmon don’t mix at Bristol Bay says the EPA.  More after this —

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The proposed Pebble Mine would put the world’s largest sockeye salmon resource at risk. That’s the conclusion of a revised 2012 Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment Report released by the Environmental Protection Agency last Friday.  Mine opponents called on the EPA to use its authority to stop the issuance of permits under the Clean Water Act.  

The report concludes again that developing one of the largest mines on earth  at the  headwaters of Bristol Bay would ruin nearly 5,000 acres of wetlands, and destroy spawning and rearing habitat, including 90 miles of streams.  Regional Administrator Dennis McLerran  –  

Cut: The EPA has made no decision about if or how it might use its authority under the Clean Water Act or other laws to protect Bristol Bay. This is an assessment, a scientific document and this is a release for additional comment and review of that scientific document. 4

The report will now undergo a new round of peer review and public comment before the EPA releases findings that could affect Pebble permitting decisions, set to begin later this year.  In response, Pebble Partnership CEO John Shively criticized the EPA for evaluating what he calls a “completely hypothetical mine plan”  instead of waiting until a real plan is submitted to.   Senator Lisa Murkowski called it a “flawed document” and the EPA process “unacceptable.” Senator Mark Begich said he opposes   pre-emptive vetoes of any project but that he looks forward to reviewing the assessment.

Meanwhile, the public can comment on the Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment Report through May 31.  EPA Administer McClellan says it is important to reach as many people as possible before they go fishing.

Cut: We realize that folks up  in Bristol bay have a fishing season, that they get underway in the summertime so getting it out and being able to have a public comment period that commence now ans was completed at the end of May would allow us to get this out for public review and comment in advance of the peak of the fishing season. 2

 Thanks to the assist from www.kdlg.org 

Fish Radio is also brought to you by Ocean Beauty Seafoods, an Alaska corporation proudly supporting Alaska’s coastal communities and the Alaskans who depend on fishing for their livelihoods and culture.  www.oceanbeauty.com    In Kodiak, I’m Laine Welch.

Read the report and submit your comments here.

http://www2.epa.gov/bristolbay