Archives for August 2016

‘Wild Taste, Amazing Place’-Bristol Bay sockeye push begins in Boulder, CO

Fish Radio
Bristol Bay sockeye branding program launches in Boulder
September 1, 2016

This is Fish Radio. I’m Laine Welch – Pitching the Bristol Bay sockeye brand in Boulder. More after this –         bbay sockeye

Take the UFA Salmon Survey and share what you know about your local fisheries. Find it at United Fishermen of Alaska’s home page and help guide the SHIP.

Did you know that the Alaska seafood brand tops all others on menus across the nation? Learn more about the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute at www.alaskaseafood.org.

September first is the start of an ambitious Bristol Bay sockeye salmon branding program in Boulder, Colorado.

We’ve been working with just about every level of the supply chain from processors to distributors and retailers to help them in their quest to source and get Bristol Bay sockeye for their stores. 

Becky Martello is director of the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association which is bankrolling the $700,000 pilot program with a one percent tax paid by driftnet fishermen on the dockside value of their catch.  The group has partnered with Anchorage-based Rising Tide Communications whose principles have hands on involvement in Alaska fishing.

The campaign theme is Wild Taste, Amazing Place – it includes training for people behind retail counters about the special features of Bristol Bay, recipes, posters, special dinners by local chefs – even branded wrapping paper for the bright red fillets.

There’s in ice signs in the case with our beautiful logo and on the back, talking points for people behind the seafood counter so they have a quick visual to tell consumers about the special, unique points about Bristol Bay sockeye. There’s seafood wrapping paper branded with the new logo and tag line and so when people buy it, it is wrapped up in beautiful craft paper and sealed with a Bristol Bay sticker.   

Fishermen will be on hand throughout the four month promotion. That’s a tie in to the new Bristol Bay sockeye website’s Know your Fisherman section.

That is huge with consumers and with our target. They really want to know where their food comes from and connecting them to the fishermen is a natural way to tell the story and it connects people to Bristol Bay and where their food comes from.  

The promotion will run through the end of the year and be evaluated by an independent firm.  The group will then decide where to go next.

So we really want to use this very targeted campaign to really measure what we are doing. We are investing a lot of our fishermen’s dollars in this and we want to make sure we are on the right track.

Meanwhile, Martello says everyone involved is excited to get the branding program underway.

We’ve had so much positive feedback from people in the industry, and fishermen about the new website and materials it is really gratifying. It’s wonderful to see that people are getting onboard with it and getting excited.  

See the snazzy new website at  http://bristolbaysockeye.org/ and find links at www.alaskafishradio.com.

Fish Radio is also brought to you by Ocean Beauty Seafoods – who salutes and says thanks to the men and women fishing across Alaska for their hard work and dedication. (www.oceanbeauty.com) In Kodiak, I’m Laine Welch

US eating trends favor seafood

Fish Radio
Eating trends favor seafood

August 31, 2016

This is Fish Radio. I’m Laine Welch — Eating trends favor fish but Americans are not eating enough. More after this –

  Take the UFA Salmon Survey and share what you know about your local fisheries. Find it at United Fishermen of Alaska’s home page and help guide the SHIP.

Did you know that the Alaska seafood brand tops all others on menus across the nation? Learn more about the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute at www.alaskaseafood.org.             Eat more fish                
Eating trends show some big plusses for wild seafood , but will that make Americans eat more of it?

According to the NPD Group, an international market tracker, the top trend is that consumers want to know where their foods come from. The Group credits seafood for improved traceability and local sourcing, and says that will continue to boost sales.

Good fats also are in. People now know that some fats are healthy, such as those found in eggs, avocados and seafood.

“Consumers are seeking non-genetically modified foods in droves,” NPD said. That will benefit wild seafood as people are demanding natural foods with fewer additives of anything, let alone genes.

Along that line, people want foods with ‘real’ ingredients and will be reading labels like never before. Healthy and light entrees are expected to grow at a faster rate through 2018, another opportunity for seafood.

Technomic, another top market research firm lists ‘trash to treasure’ fish as its #3 seafood trend, as more restaurants serve up bycatch and lesser known fish.

Both market watchers said more people are cooking fish at home. Maybe that will boost consumption, which has stalled at under 15 pounds a year per American.

I can see that people understand that seafood is good for them. The hurdles come from knowing how to buy it and cook it and really understand the different varieties of seafood that they can include in their diet. So it’s really helping to motivate positive behaviors with eating seafood. 

Linda Cornish is director of the nonprofit Seafood Nutrition Partnership.

A study last year by the USDA showed only one in ten Americans follow US Dietary Guidelines to eat seafood at last twice a week.

Fish Radio is also brought to you by Ocean Beauty Seafoods – who salutes and says thanks to the men and women fishing across Alaska for their hard work and dedication. (www.oceanbeauty.com) In Kodiak, I’m Laine Welch